Travels with Elizabeth Simcoe: A Visual Journey Through Upper and Lower Canada - Page Banner

Travels Around the Niagara Peninsula


Queenston

Watercolour: Queenston Barracks, Ontario, [ca. 1793] (detail)
Click to see a larger version (153K)

Queenston Barracks, Ontario, [ca. 1793], (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Watercolour paper
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-69
Archives of Ontario, I0006921

“I suffered exquisite pain all day from a mosquito bite, which the extreme heat increased, and at night my sleeve was obliged to be cut open. I did not see any rattlesnakes, although many ladies are afraid to do to the Table Rock, as it is said there are many of these snakes near it. There are crayfish in very small pools of water. Mr. McDonnell said that pounded crayfish applied to the ”

- July 30th, 1792

Watercolour: Queenstown, [ca. 1893] (detail)
Click to see a larger version (146K)

Queenstown, [ca. 1893], (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/paper
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-94
Archives of Ontario, I0006946

“...the Gov'r set out this Even'g to sleep at the Landing intending to go to-morrow to Ft. Erie 30 miles - Mr. Talbot drove me & we returned to Supper at Navy Hall, we saw a fine Bald Eagle on the Wing. ”

- August 3rd, 1792

Watercolour: Barracks at Queenstown, [ca. 1792] (detail)
Click to see a larger version (162K)

Barracks at Queenstown, [ca. 1792], (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/paper
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-72
Archives of Ontario, I0006924

“I desired to drive out last evening, though everybody foretold an approaching thunderstorm, which indeed came on with great violence . . . I feared that the lightning would make the horse run away, but he only started at every flash. The recollection that it was my own determination [which] brought me into danger was very unpleasant. However, we got back safe and in time to save the marquees from being blown over. The Governor preserved ours by having the cords held until the violence of the storm was over. The tents were so near the river that we were afraid they would be blown into it.”

- August 17th, 1792

“We were so cold and wet we were glad to drink tea. It was quite dark and too windy to allow of our burning candles . . . I wrapped myself up in two or three greatcoats and intended, if the tent was blown down, to take shelter under the great dinner table. The rain and wind did not cease for two hours, and we had no means of drying our clothes and were obliged to sleep in a wet tent. However, we have not caught cold.”

- August 17, 1792



Burlington Bay



“The Gov'r set out [from Niagara] to walk to Burlington Bay at the head of Lake Ontario about 50 miles from hence.”

- December 10th, 1792

“The Gov'r returned at 5 to-day from his walk to Burlington Bay, the shores of the lake are for a great distance as high as at the Falls of Niagara, and several small rivers, falling from that height, make picturesque scenes.”

- December 17th, 1792

Watercolour: Burlington Bay, Lake Ontario, June 10, 1796  (detail)
Click to see a larger version (165K)

Burlington Bay, Lake Ontario, June 10, 1796, (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/paper
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-190
Archives of Ontario, I0007042

Watercolour: Burlington Bay, [ca. 1796] (detail)
Click to see a larger version (160K)

Burlington Bay, [ca. 1796], (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Watercolour paper, full
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-204
Archives of Ontario, I0007056

Watercolour: Burlington Bay, June 11, 1796 (detail)
Click to see a larger version (147K)

Burlington Bay, June 11, 1796, (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Watercolour paper, full
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-205
Archives of Ontario, I0007057