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“ . . . we coasted to the forty (forty miles from Niagara) & passed in at 3 o'clock - the mouth of this Creek forms a very fine scene - a very bold spur of the Allegany appears beautiful as the distance it is about 3 miles off.”

- May 10th, 1794



“The mouth of this creek forms a very fine scene. Some cottages are prettily placed on the banks of the River, & a Saw Mill affords a quantity of boards which piled up in a wood makes a varied fore ground - It was almost 6 before we reached the 20 Mile Pond the mouth of another Creek.”

- May 10th, 1794



Watercolour: 40 Mile Creek, [ca. 1794] (detail)
Click to see a larger version (141K)

40 Mile Creek, [ca. 1794] (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/card, grey
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-122
Archives of Ontario, I0006974

Watercolour: 40 Mile Creek [May], [ca. 1794], (detail)
Click to see a larger version (150K)

40 Mile Creek [May], [ca. 1794] (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/card, full
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-119
Archives of Ontario, I0006971

Watercolour: Near the 40 Mile Creek rocks where the wolves descend to the plain below, June 9, 1796 (detail)
Click to see a larger version (161K)

Near the 40 Mile Creek rocks where
the wolves descend to the plain below,
June 9, 1796 (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/paper
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-210
Archives of Ontario, I0007062

“The Governor was walking on the hill this evening when his shoulder and finger were struck by a shot fired by a soldier belonging to the guard tent, who had fired at an Indian dog which had taken away some pork. A shot remained in the Governor's finger and was very painful. A gentleman walking with him was struck and the dog severely wounded. An Indian was also struck by the shot. The Governor immediately gave him the soldier's gun to appease him and reprimanded the soldier.”

- Thursday July 17, 1794


“We dined on the beach at the Twenty-Mile Creek and went across the great pond to one of Col. Butler's houses, where we slept, after taking great pains to smoke the house and fix the mosquito net well; for this place abounds so much with mosquitoes that the farmer does not sleep in his house from June til September, but sleeps in his barn to avoid them. The pond is full of wild rice, a marshy weed.”

- July 27th, 1794



Watercolour: 20 Mile Creek, Ontario, May 10, 1794 (detail)

Click to see a larger version (165K)

20 Mile Creek, Ontario, May 10, 1794, (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/paper
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-130
Archives of Ontario, I0006982

“We rose at six and left for the Forty-Mile Creek. We walked through the village and beyond Green's Mills a little way up the mountain . . . Green [a Loyalist from New Jersey who had settled in the area around 1788 and accompanied Simcoe on many of his trips) ground the corn for all the military posts in Upper Canada. His mill stood five miles east of Hamilton on the Stoney Creek Road. A mile further is a mill and a small waterfall, and at a season when the water is higher the scenery must be wonderfully fine. I drank tea at Green's and unwillingly left this fine scenery. Mrs. Green advised me to give Francis crow's foot boiled in milk until it becomes red and thick, which she said would cure the present complaint in his stomach. There are 100 people settled at the Forty, and there have been but seven graves in five years. The Governor promises that I shall ride on the mountain above the Forty this season.”

- July 28, 1794



Watercolour: Near the 40 Mile Creek L. Ontario, [ca. 1794] (detail)
Click to see a larger version (154K)

Near the 40 Mile Creek L. Ontario, [ca. 1794], (detail)
Elizabeth Simcoe, (1766-1850)
Wash/paper
Reference Code: F 47-11-1-0-121
Archives of Ontario, I0006973

The family wasn't back in Niagara very long before it was decided that Elizabeth should take the children to Quebec. There were developing fears of an American invasion and so in September of 1794, they departed by ship to visit friends in Quebec.